Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘NPJ Book Review’

Arab and Jew, Wounded Spirits in a Promised Land, Revised & Updated by David K. Shipler (2015) Some works are read over weeks and not days. This is one of those journeys. It’s a substantial, poignant, disturbing, accessible work that reads like a journal. It’s in the category for which Pulitzers are given and been […]

Read Full Post »

The Philosophy of the Bed by Mary Eden and Richard Carrington (1961) I’ve been reading this book while sleeping in different hotel beds. This is one of those books I classify as a gem and I brought along from my personal library for some insights into the sensuality and the realities of the bed throughout history. […]

Read Full Post »

Democracy and the Problem of Free Speech by Cass R. Sunstein 1995 Sunstein’s work is a reference tool to be intellectually chewed in morsels and one is provoked to think about applying James Madison’s constitutional thoughts about free speech and democracy. The words of the First Amendment remain essentially as articulated in the draft of the […]

Read Full Post »

Citizens, A Chronicle of the French Revolution by Simon Schama (1989) “In some depressing sense, violence was the revolution itself,” Schama states in the opening pages. Simon Schama’s work comes across as that of an expert devoted to his subject and guided by the opinions and ideas of the day in streets of Paris, France […]

Read Full Post »

The Manipulated Mind by Denise Winn (2000) This in an interesting book if one is seeking to know more about elementary aspects of mind control and social conditioning. There are any number of ideas built into the framework of the author’ discussion the least of which is, what do we mean by free will? That […]

Read Full Post »

NPJ Book Review: Boethius, The Consolation of Philosophy, translated by David R. Slavitt (2008) This is one of several, and my preferred translation, of this brief but substantial work between a man, awaiting execution in the year 524, and his intimate yet dispassionate conversation with an imaginary woman, Lady Philosophy. Boethius was a Roman patrician, […]

Read Full Post »

 The Human Condition by Hannah Arendt (1958) Hannah Arendt is an acquired taste. I periodically reread books that I’ve read in the past to see if I read something different in a work the second time around. Arendt’s writings in my opinion are provocative from a political, philosophical and sociological perspective but once acquired one […]

Read Full Post »

Critical Reflections on the Paranormal, Eds, Michael Stoeber and Hugo Meynell (1996) Gathering dust on my shelf I decided to reread this slender scholarly work. Though studied by academics since the late 1800s with the founding of the Society for Psychical Research in London in 1882 and in the United States in 1885, the critical […]

Read Full Post »

Private Government: How Employers Rule Our Lives (and Why We Don’t Talk about It) by Elizabeth Anderson (2017) This is a book that’s been long overdue. Anderson offers a scholarly and thought-provoking study of how corporate America is a form of private government. She discusses how the average employee in the private sector acts as if […]

Read Full Post »

The Crisis of the Middle-Class Constitution, Why Economic Inequality Threatens Our Republic by Ganesh Sitaraman (2017) Sitaraman makes a good case that the number one threat to the America’s constitutional government is the collapse of the middle class. He argues that unlike warfare constitutions that the U.S. Constitution was shaped and designed by relative economic […]

Read Full Post »

Homo Deus, A Brief History of Tomorrow by Yuval Noah Harari (2017)  My take: Homo Deus or “Man of God” is a studied and knowledgeable work; as a humanist and existentialist I find myself at intellectual odds with the author’s description of classical liberal, humanism and free will. It’s a bit too stereotypical. That said, Harari […]

Read Full Post »

Reason for Being, A Meditation on Ecclesiastes by Jacques Ellul (1990) When I first read Ellul’s work, I felt as an existentialist I was in an existential conversation about the meaning of life rather than being engaged in the plethora of “touchy feely” as well as sensitive and “solemn” interpretations from various theological perspectives. I reread […]

Read Full Post »

Existential Psychotherapy by Irvin Yalom. (1980) This is the work of a prominent thinker that inspires and provokes. I read this work in the mid-1980’and still use it as a reference. It seems to be more relevant with each passing year. Irvin Yalom, a psychiatrist, writes in sensitive and scholarly terms and offers provocative insights […]

Read Full Post »

The Knowledge Illusion: Why We Never Think Alone by Steven Sloman, Philip Fernbach (2017) Officially this work doesn’t hit the marketplace until the next week or so. And my opinion expressed here is just that – an opinion. Thinking is a complicated business. In “What is Called Thinking,” Martin Heidegger, the German philosopher once asked in a […]

Read Full Post »

During the late 1980’s I purchased the three-volume set of The Temple Scroll edited by Yigael Yadin (1983) from The Israel Exploration Society at The institute of Archaeology, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, during a time in which I had an interest in the Second Temple among other ancient writings. In the preface of the […]

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »